26 June 2018

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Babu crossing a flooded street during heavy tidal flood in Chittagong. In the past few years, Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. If things continue to worsen, most area of Chittagong could become completely submerged in the near future.   A World Bank study that was released June 19,2013 forecasts a two degrees Celsius rise in the world’s average temperature in the next decades. Considering the present warming trends, the reports warns that even 20 to 30 years from now shifting rain patterns could leave some areas of the country under water and some others without enough water for power generation, irrigation or even drinking. Flood affected areas could increase by as much as 29 percent for a 2.5 degrees Celsius temperature rise in Bangladesh, says the report. If the sea level rises 65 cm in 2080,around 40 percent arable land will be lost in southern Bangladesh, it notes about 20 million people in the coastal areas are affected by salinity in drinking water and rising sea levels. Chittagong is often regarded as the commercial and industrial capital of Bangladesh.  Estimated population of the city is more than 6.5 million. The Port of Chittagong is an important driver of the Bangladeshi economy, handling over 90% of the country's international trade. The effects of climate change – rising sea level and sea surface temperature, emission of carbon by first world country, deforestation, global warming  – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in Chittagong city and coastal areas of Bangladesh.

tidal flood devastated most of the area of chittagong city.millions of people marooned in tidal flood and life become stand still. Traders at Khatunganj and Chaktai, two major wholesale hubs of commodities, have been counting losses for tidal surges in the last three days.thousands of people and their houses effected by tidal flood. In the past few years, Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. If things continue to worsen, most area of Chittagong could become completely submerged in the near future.   A World Bank study that was released June 19,2013 forecasts a two degrees Celsius rise in the world’s average temperature in the next decades. Considering the present warming trends, the reports warns that even 20 to 30 years from now shifting rain patterns could leave some areas of the country under water and some others without enough water for power generation, irrigation or even drinking. Flood affected areas could increase by as much as 29 percent for a 2.5 degrees Celsius temperature rise in Bangladesh, says the report. If the sea level rises 65 cm in 2080,around 40 percent arable land will be lost in southern Bangladesh, it notes about 20 million people in the coastal areas are affected by salinity in drinking water and rising sea levels. Chittagong is often regarded as the commercial and industrial capital of Bangladesh.  Estimated population of the city is more than 6.5 million. The Port of Chittagong is an important driver of the Bangladeshi economy, handling over 90% of the country's international trade. The effects of climate change – rising sea level and sea surface temperature, emission of carbon by first world country, deforestation, global warming  – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in Chittagong city and coastal areas o

 

Babu crossing a flooded street during heavy tidal flood in Chittagong. In the past few years, Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. If things continue to worsen, most area of Chittagong could become completely submerged in the near future.   A World Bank study that was released June 19,2013 forecasts a two degrees Celsius rise in the world’s average temperature in the next decades. Considering the present warming trends, the reports warns that even 20 to 30 years from now shifting rain patterns could leave some areas of the country under water and some others without enough water for power generation, irrigation or even drinking. Flood affected areas could increase by as much as 29 percent for a 2.5 degrees Celsius temperature rise in Bangladesh, says the report. If the sea level rises 65 cm in 2080,around 40 percent arable land will be lost in southern Bangladesh, it notes about 20 million people in the coastal areas are affected by salinity in drinking water and rising sea levels. Chittagong is often regarded as the commercial and industrial capital of Bangladesh.  Estimated population of the city is more than 6.5 million. The Port of Chittagong is an important driver of the Bangladeshi economy, handling over 90% of the country's international trade. The effects of climate change – rising sea level and sea surface temperature, emission of carbon by first world country, deforestation, global warming  – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in Chittagong city and coastal areas of Bangladesh.

 

 

tidal flood devastated most of the area of chittagong city.millions of people marooned in tidal flood and life become stand still. Traders at Khatunganj and Chaktai, two major wholesale hubs of commodities, have been counting losses for tidal surges in the last three days.thousands of people and their houses effected by tidal flood. In the past few years, Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. If things continue to worsen, most area of Chittagong could become completely submerged in the near future.   A World Bank study that was released June 19,2013 forecasts a two degrees Celsius rise in the world’s average temperature in the next decades. Considering the present warming trends, the reports warns that even 20 to 30 years from now shifting rain patterns could leave some areas of the country under water and some others without enough water for power generation, irrigation or even drinking. Flood affected areas could increase by as much as 29 percent for a 2.5 degrees Celsius temperature rise in Bangladesh, says the report. If the sea level rises 65 cm in 2080,around 40 percent arable land will be lost in southern Bangladesh, it notes about 20 million people in the coastal areas are affected by salinity in drinking water and rising sea levels. Chittagong is often regarded as the commercial and industrial capital of Bangladesh.  Estimated population of the city is more than 6.5 million. The Port of Chittagong is an important driver of the Bangladeshi economy, handling over 90% of the country's international trade. The effects of climate change – rising sea level and sea surface temperature, emission of carbon by first world country, deforestation, global warming  – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in Chittagong city and coastal areas o

tidal flood devastated most of the area of chittagong city.millions of people marooned in tidal flood and life become stand still. Traders at Khatunganj and Chaktai, two major wholesale hubs of commodities, have been counting losses for tidal surges in the last three days.thousands of people and their houses effected by tidal flood. In the past few years, Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. If things continue to worsen, most area of Chittagong could become completely submerged in the near future.   A World Bank study that was released June 19,2013 forecasts a two degrees Celsius rise in the world’s average temperature in the next decades. Considering the present warming trends, the reports warns that even 20 to 30 years from now shifting rain patterns could leave some areas of the country under water and some others without enough water for power generation, irrigation or even drinking. Flood affected areas could increase by as much as 29 percent for a 2.5 degrees Celsius temperature rise in Bangladesh, says the report. If the sea level rises 65 cm in 2080,around 40 percent arable land will be lost in southern Bangladesh, it notes about 20 million people in the coastal areas are affected by salinity in drinking water and rising sea levels. Chittagong is often regarded as the commercial and industrial capital of Bangladesh.  Estimated population of the city is more than 6.5 million. The Port of Chittagong is an important driver of the Bangladeshi economy, handling over 90% of the country's international trade. The effects of climate change – rising sea level and sea surface temperature, emission of carbon by first world country, deforestation, global warming  – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in Chittagong city and coastal areas o

Babu crossing a flooded street during heavy tidal flood in Chittagong. In the past few years, Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. If things continue to worsen, most area of Chittagong could become completely submerged in the near future.   A World Bank study that was released June 19,2013 forecasts a two degrees Celsius rise in the world’s average temperature in the next decades. Considering the present warming trends, the reports warns that even 20 to 30 years from now shifting rain patterns could leave some areas of the country under water and some others without enough water for power generation, irrigation or even drinking. Flood affected areas could increase by as much as 29 percent for a 2.5 degrees Celsius temperature rise in Bangladesh, says the report. If the sea level rises 65 cm in 2080,around 40 percent arable land will be lost in southern Bangladesh, it notes about 20 million people in the coastal areas are affected by salinity in drinking water and rising sea levels. Chittagong is often regarded as the commercial and industrial capital of Bangladesh.  Estimated population of the city is more than 6.5 million. The Port of Chittagong is an important driver of the Bangladeshi economy, handling over 90% of the country's international trade. The effects of climate change – rising sea level and sea surface temperature, emission of carbon by first world country, deforestation, global warming  – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in Chittagong city and coastal areas of Bangladesh.

Babu crossing a flooded street during heavy tidal flood in Chittagong. In the past few years, Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. If things continue to worsen, most area of Chittagong could become completely submerged in the near future.   A World Bank study that was released June 19,2013 forecasts a two degrees Celsius rise in the world’s average temperature in the next decades. Considering the present warming trends, the reports warns that even 20 to 30 years from now shifting rain patterns could leave some areas of the country under water and some others without enough water for power generation, irrigation or even drinking. Flood affected areas could increase by as much as 29 percent for a 2.5 degrees Celsius temperature rise in Bangladesh, says the report. If the sea level rises 65 cm in 2080,around 40 percent arable land will be lost in southern Bangladesh, it notes about 20 million people in the coastal areas are affected by salinity in drinking water and rising sea levels. Chittagong is often regarded as the commercial and industrial capital of Bangladesh.  Estimated population of the city is more than 6.5 million. The Port of Chittagong is an important driver of the Bangladeshi economy, handling over 90% of the country's international trade. The effects of climate change – rising sea level and sea surface temperature, emission of carbon by first world country, deforestation, global warming  – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in Chittagong city and coastal areas of Bangladesh.

23 February 2017

In the past few years, Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts – has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas.

If things continue to worsen, most area of Chittagong could become completely submerged in the near future.

A World Bank study that was released June 19,2013 forecasts a two degrees Celsius rise in the world’s average temperature in the next decades.
Considering the present warming trends, the reports warns that even 20 to 30 years from now shifting rain patterns could leave some areas of the country under water and some others without enough water for power generation, irrigation or even drinking.
Flood affected areas could increase by as much as 29 percent for a 2.5 degrees Celsius temperature rise in Bangladesh, says the report.
If the sea level rises 65 cm in 2080,around 40 percent arable land will be lost in southern Bangladesh, it notes about 20 million people in the coastal areas are affected by salinity in drinking water and rising sea levels.

Chittagong is often regarded as the commercial and industrial capital of Bangladesh.
Estimated population of the city is more than 6.5 million. The Port of Chittagong is an important driver of the Bangladeshi economy, handling over 90% of the country’s international trade. The effects of climate change – rising sea level and sea surface temperature, emission of carbon by first world country, deforestation, global warming  – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in Chittagong city and coastal areas of Bangladesh.

 

 

 

 

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In the past few years, Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts – has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas.

If things continue to worsen, most area of Chittagong could become completely submerged in the near future.

A World Bank study that was released June 19,2013 forecasts a two degrees Celsius rise in the world’s average temperature in the next decades.
Considering the present warming trends, the reports warns that even 20 to 30 years from now shifting rain patterns could leave some areas of the country under water and some others without enough water for power generation, irrigation or even drinking.
Flood affected areas could increase by as much as 29 percent for a 2.5 degrees Celsius temperature rise in Bangladesh, says the report.
If the sea level rises 65 cm in 2080,around 40 percent arable land will be lost in southern Bangladesh, it notes about 20 million people in the coastal areas are affected by salinity in drinking water and rising sea levels.

Chittagong is often regarded as the commercial and industrial capital of Bangladesh.
Estimated population of the city is more than 6.5 million. The Port of Chittagong is an important driver of the Bangladeshi economy, handling over 90% of the country’s international trade. The effects of climate change – rising sea level and sea surface temperature, emission of carbon by first world country, deforestation, global warming  – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in Chittagong city and coastal areas of Bangladesh.

 

_MG_5805

In the past few years, Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts – has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas.

If things continue to worsen, most area of Chittagong could become completely submerged in the near future.

A World Bank study that was released June 19,2013 forecasts a two degrees Celsius rise in the world’s average temperature in the next decades.
Considering the present warming trends, the reports warns that even 20 to 30 years from now shifting rain patterns could leave some areas of the country under water and some others without enough water for power generation, irrigation or even drinking.
Flood affected areas could increase by as much as 29 percent for a 2.5 degrees Celsius temperature rise in Bangladesh, says the report.
If the sea level rises 65 cm in 2080,around 40 percent arable land will be lost in southern Bangladesh, it notes about 20 million people in the coastal areas are affected by salinity in drinking water and rising sea levels.

Chittagong is often regarded as the commercial and industrial capital of Bangladesh.
Estimated population of the city is more than 6.5 million. The Port of Chittagong is an important driver of the Bangladeshi economy, handling over 90% of the country’s international trade. The effects of climate change – rising sea level and sea surface temperature, emission of carbon by first world country, deforestation, global warming  – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in Chittagong city and coastal areas of Bangladesh.

 

Babu crossing a flooded street during heavy tidal flood in Chittagong. In the past few years, Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. If things continue to worsen, most area of Chittagong could become completely submerged in the near future. A World Bank study that was released June 19,2013 forecasts a two degrees Celsius rise in the world’s average temperature in the next decades. Considering the present warming trends, the reports warns that even 20 to 30 years from now shifting rain patterns could leave some areas of the country under water and some others without enough water for power generation, irrigation or even drinking. Flood affected areas could increase by as much as 29 percent for a 2.5 degrees Celsius temperature rise in Bangladesh, says the report. If the sea level rises 65 cm in 2080,around 40 percent arable land will be lost in southern Bangladesh, it notes about 20 million people in the coastal areas are affected by salinity in drinking water and rising sea levels. Chittagong is often regarded as the commercial and industrial capital of Bangladesh. Estimated population of the city is more than 6.5 million. The Port of Chittagong is an important driver of the Bangladeshi economy, handling over 90% of the country's international trade. The effects of climate change – rising sea level and sea surface temperature, emission of carbon by first world country, deforestation, global warming – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in Chittagong city and coastal areas of Bangladesh.

Babu crossing a flooded street during heavy tidal flood in Chittagong. In the past few years, Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. If things continue to worsen, most area of Chittagong could become completely submerged in the near future. A World Bank study that was released June 19,2013 forecasts a two degrees Celsius rise in the world’s average temperature in the next decades. Considering the present warming trends, the reports warns that even 20 to 30 years from now shifting rain patterns could leave some areas of the country under water and some others without enough water for power generation, irrigation or even drinking. Flood affected areas could increase by as much as 29 percent for a 2.5 degrees Celsius temperature rise in Bangladesh, says the report. If the sea level rises 65 cm in 2080,around 40 percent arable land will be lost in southern Bangladesh, it notes about 20 million people in the coastal areas are affected by salinity in drinking water and rising sea levels. Chittagong is often regarded as the commercial and industrial capital of Bangladesh. Estimated population of the city is more than 6.5 million. The Port of Chittagong is an important driver of the Bangladeshi economy, handling over 90% of the country's international trade. The effects of climate change – rising sea level and sea surface temperature, emission of carbon by first world country, deforestation, global warming – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in Chittagong city and coastal areas of Bangladesh.

Babu crossing a flooded street during heavy tidal flood in Chittagong. In the past few years, Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. If things continue to worsen, most area of Chittagong could become completely submerged in the near future. A World Bank study that was released June 19,2013 forecasts a two degrees Celsius rise in the world’s average temperature in the next decades. Considering the present warming trends, the reports warns that even 20 to 30 years from now shifting rain patterns could leave some areas of the country under water and some others without enough water for power generation, irrigation or even drinking. Flood affected areas could increase by as much as 29 percent for a 2.5 degrees Celsius temperature rise in Bangladesh, says the report. If the sea level rises 65 cm in 2080,around 40 percent arable land will be lost in southern Bangladesh, it notes about 20 million people in the coastal areas are affected by salinity in drinking water and rising sea levels. Chittagong is often regarded as the commercial and industrial capital of Bangladesh. Estimated population of the city is more than 6.5 million. The Port of Chittagong is an important driver of the Bangladeshi economy, handling over 90% of the country's international trade. The effects of climate change – rising sea level and sea surface temperature, emission of carbon by first world country, deforestation, global warming – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in Chittagong city and coastal areas of Bangladesh.

tidal flood devastated most of the area of chittagong city.millions of people marooned in tidal flood and life become stand still. Traders at Khatunganj and Chaktai, two major wholesale hubs of commodities, have been counting losses for tidal surges in the last three days.thousands of people and their houses effected by tidal flood. In the past few years, Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. If things continue to worsen, most area of Chittagong could become completely submerged in the near future. A World Bank study that was released June 19,2013 forecasts a two degrees Celsius rise in the world’s average temperature in the next decades. Considering the present warming trends, the reports warns that even 20 to 30 years from now shifting rain patterns could leave some areas of the country under water and some others without enough water for power generation, irrigation or even drinking. Flood affected areas could increase by as much as 29 percent for a 2.5 degrees Celsius temperature rise in Bangladesh, says the report. If the sea level rises 65 cm in 2080,around 40 percent arable land will be lost in southern Bangladesh, it notes about 20 million people in the coastal areas are affected by salinity in drinking water and rising sea levels. Chittagong is often regarded as the commercial and industrial capital of Bangladesh. Estimated population of the city is more than 6.5 million. The Port of Chittagong is an important driver of the Bangladeshi economy, handling over 90% of the country's international trade. The effects of climate change – rising sea level and sea surface temperature, emission of carbon by first world country, deforestation, global warming – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in Chittagong city and coastal areas o

In the past few years, Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts – has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas.

If things continue to worsen, most area of Chittagong could become completely submerged in the near future.

A World Bank study that was released June 19,2013 forecasts a two degrees Celsius rise in the world’s average temperature in the next decades.
Considering the present warming trends, the reports warns that even 20 to 30 years from now shifting rain patterns could leave some areas of the country under water and some others without enough water for power generation, irrigation or even drinking.
Flood affected areas could increase by as much as 29 percent for a 2.5 degrees Celsius temperature rise in Bangladesh, says the report.
If the sea level rises 65 cm in 2080,around 40 percent arable land will be lost in southern Bangladesh, it notes about 20 million people in the coastal areas are affected by salinity in drinking water and rising sea levels.

Chittagong is often regarded as the commercial and industrial capital of Bangladesh.
Estimated population of the city is more than 6.5 million. The Port of Chittagong is an important driver of the Bangladeshi economy, handling over 90% of the country’s international trade. The effects of climate change – rising sea level and sea surface temperature, emission of carbon by first world country, deforestation, global warming  – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in Chittagong city and coastal areas of Bangladesh.

 

Sian (6) at her house submerged by flood water at Chaktai, Chittagong. Tidal flood inundated many places in Chittagong causing great damage to inhabitants. In the past few years, climate change has begun to take a major toll on my home city of Chittagong, Bangladesh. Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. Chittagong, the second-largest city in the country, is densely populated by people from all over Bangladesh who have come to the city to make a living, leaving areas plagued by river erosion, lack of jobs, and natural disasters such as cyclones. As they become refugees in this mega-city, however, they still find it difficult to deal with these recent onsets of climate change; the effects upon as large of a city as Chittagong are alarming. Locals such as myself are growing increasingly concerned, as we all may have to shift from our original localities due to this excess of water. My ongoing project “Water World” seeks to bring these issues to light. The effects of climate change – rising sea levels and sea surface temperatures, resulting in greater instances of low pressure in the Bay of Bengal – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in coastal areas. Chittagong and Khulna, two major ports and business cities, are greatly threatened. The most heavily effected places are the old parts of Chittagong, like Chaktai, Khatunganj, Bakolia, and Agrabad. If things continue to worsen, the business hubs of Chaktai and Khatunganj could become completely submerged in the near future. The millions of people living in these areas have to battle tidal surge sometimes twice a day. Prior to this sudden regularity, the only tidal surge in remembered history occurred during 1991, when a hurricane hit the coastal area of Chittagong. The new,

 

Abrar (6) at his house submerged by flood water at Chaktai, Chittagong. In the past few years, climate change has begun to take a major toll on my home city of Chittagong, Bangladesh. Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. Chittagong, the second-largest city in the country, is densely populated by people from all over Bangladesh who have come to the city to make a living, leaving areas plagued by river erosion, lack of jobs, and natural disasters such as cyclones. As they become refugees in this mega-city, however, they still find it difficult to deal with these recent onsets of climate change; the effects upon as large of a city as Chittagong are alarming. Locals such as myself are growing increasingly concerned, as we all may have to shift from our original localities due to this excess of water. My ongoing project “Water World” seeks to bring these issues to light. The effects of climate change – rising sea levels and sea surface temperatures, resulting in greater instances of low pressure in the Bay of Bengal – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in coastal areas. Chittagong and Khulna, two major ports and business cities, are greatly threatened. The most heavily effected places are the old parts of Chittagong, like Chaktai, Khatunganj, Bakolia, and Agrabad. If things continue to worsen, the business hubs of Chaktai and Khatunganj could become completely submerged in the near future. The millions of people living in these areas have to battle tidal surge sometimes twice a day. Prior to this sudden regularity, the only tidal surge in remembered history occurred during 1991, when a hurricane hit the coastal area of Chittagong. The new, frequent tidal surges are even higher than that in 1991 and can remain for days on

Saima (7) at her house submerged by tidal flood water at Chaktai, Chittagong. In the past few years, climate change has begun to take a major toll on my home city of Chittagong, Bangladesh. Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. Chittagong, the second-largest city in the country, is densely populated by people from all over Bangladesh who have come to the city to make a living, leaving areas plagued by river erosion, lack of jobs, and natural disasters such as cyclones. As they become refugees in this mega-city, however, they still find it difficult to deal with these recent onsets of climate change; the effects upon as large of a city as Chittagong are alarming. Locals such as myself are growing increasingly concerned, as we all may have to shift from our original localities due to this excess of water. My ongoing project “Water World” seeks to bring these issues to light. The effects of climate change – rising sea levels and sea surface temperatures, resulting in greater instances of low pressure in the Bay of Bengal – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in coastal areas. Chittagong and Khulna, two major ports and business cities, are greatly threatened. The most heavily effected places are the old parts of Chittagong, like Chaktai, Khatunganj, Bakolia, and Agrabad. If things continue to worsen, the business hubs of Chaktai and Khatunganj could become completely submerged in the near future. The millions of people living in these areas have to battle tidal surge sometimes twice a day. Prior to this sudden regularity, the only tidal surge in remembered history occurred during 1991, when a hurricane hit the coastal area of Chittagong. The new, frequent tidal surges are even higher than that in 1991 and can remain for d

Farzana (27) at her house submerged by flood water at Chaktai, Chittagong. Tidal flood inundated many places in Chittagong causing great damage to inhabitants. In the past few years, climate change has begun to take a major toll on my home city of Chittagong, Bangladesh. Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. Chittagong, the second-largest city in the country, is densely populated by people from all over Bangladesh who have come to the city to make a living, leaving areas plagued by river erosion, lack of jobs, and natural disasters such as cyclones. As they become refugees in this mega-city, however, they still find it difficult to deal with these recent onsets of climate change; the effects upon as large of a city as Chittagong are alarming. Locals such as myself are growing increasingly concerned, as we all may have to shift from our original localities due to this excess of water. My ongoing project “Water World” seeks to bring these issues to light. The effects of climate change – rising sea levels and sea surface temperatures, resulting in greater instances of low pressure in the Bay of Bengal – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in coastal areas. Chittagong and Khulna, two major ports and business cities, are greatly threatened. The most heavily effected places are the old parts of Chittagong, like Chaktai, Khatunganj, Bakolia, and Agrabad. If things continue to worsen, the business hubs of Chaktai and Khatunganj could become completely submerged in the near future. The millions of people living in these areas have to battle tidal surge sometimes twice a day. Prior to this sudden regularity, the only tidal surge in remembered history occurred during 1991, when a hurricane hit the coastal area of Chittagong. The

Koli (24) at her house submerged by flood water at Chaktai, Chittagong. In the past few years, climate change has begun to take a major toll on my home city of Chittagong, Bangladesh. Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. Chittagong, the second-largest city in the country, is densely populated by people from all over Bangladesh who have come to the city to make a living, leaving areas plagued by river erosion, lack of jobs, and natural disasters such as cyclones. As they become refugees in this mega-city, however, they still find it difficult to deal with these recent onsets of climate change; the effects upon as large of a city as Chittagong are alarming. Locals such as myself are growing increasingly concerned, as we all may have to shift from our original localities due to this excess of water. My ongoing project “Water World” seeks to bring these issues to light. The effects of climate change – rising sea levels and sea surface temperatures, resulting in greater instances of low pressure in the Bay of Bengal – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in coastal areas. Chittagong and Khulna, two major ports and business cities, are greatly threatened. The most heavily effected places are the old parts of Chittagong, like Chaktai, Khatunganj, Bakolia, and Agrabad. If things continue to worsen, the business hubs of Chaktai and Khatunganj could become completely submerged in the near future. The millions of people living in these areas have to battle tidal surge sometimes twice a day. Prior to this sudden regularity, the only tidal surge in remembered history occurred during 1991, when a hurricane hit the coastal area of Chittagong. The new, frequent tidal surges are even higher than that in 1991 and can remain for days on e

Mehrab(15) at his house submerged by flood water at Chaktai, Chittagong. In the past few years, climate change has begun to take a major toll on my home city of Chittagong, Bangladesh. Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. Chittagong, the second-largest city in the country, is densely populated by people from all over Bangladesh who have come to the city to make a living, leaving areas plagued by river erosion, lack of jobs, and natural disasters such as cyclones. As they become refugees in this mega-city, however, they still find it difficult to deal with these recent onsets of climate change; the effects upon as large of a city as Chittagong are alarming. Locals such as myself are growing increasingly concerned, as we all may have to shift from our original localities due to this excess of water. My ongoing project “Water World” seeks to bring these issues to light. The effects of climate change – rising sea levels and sea surface temperatures, resulting in greater instances of low pressure in the Bay of Bengal – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in coastal areas. Chittagong and Khulna, two major ports and business cities, are greatly threatened. The most heavily effected places are the old parts of Chittagong, like Chaktai, Khatunganj, Bakolia, and Agrabad. If things continue to worsen, the business hubs of Chaktai and Khatunganj could become completely submerged in the near future. The millions of people living in these areas have to battle tidal surge sometimes twice a day. Prior to this sudden regularity, the only tidal surge in remembered history occurred during 1991, when a hurricane hit the coastal area of Chittagong. The new, frequent tidal surges are even higher than that in 1991 and can remain for days on

Mintoo( 38) at his house submerged by flood water at Chaktai, Chittagong. In the past few years, climate change has begun to take a major toll on my home city of Chittagong, Bangladesh. Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. Chittagong, the second-largest city in the country, is densely populated by people from all over Bangladesh who have come to the city to make a living, leaving areas plagued by river erosion, lack of jobs, and natural disasters such as cyclones. As they become refugees in this mega-city, however, they still find it difficult to deal with these recent onsets of climate change; the effects upon as large of a city as Chittagong are alarming. Locals such as myself are growing increasingly concerned, as we all may have to shift from our original localities due to this excess of water. My ongoing project “Water World” seeks to bring these issues to light. The effects of climate change – rising sea levels and sea surface temperatures, resulting in greater instances of low pressure in the Bay of Bengal – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in coastal areas. Chittagong and Khulna, two major ports and business cities, are greatly threatened. The most heavily effected places are the old parts of Chittagong, like Chaktai, Khatunganj, Bakolia, and Agrabad. If things continue to worsen, the business hubs of Chaktai and Khatunganj could become completely submerged in the near future. The millions of people living in these areas have to battle tidal surge sometimes twice a day. Prior to this sudden regularity, the only tidal surge in remembered history occurred during 1991, when a hurricane hit the coastal area of Chittagong. The new, frequent tidal surges are even higher than that in 1991 and can remain for days o

Yousuf (52) at his house submerged by flood water at Chaktai, Chittagong. In the past few years, climate change has begun to take a major toll on my home city of Chittagong, Bangladesh. Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. Chittagong, the second-largest city in the country, is densely populated by people from all over Bangladesh who have come to the city to make a living, leaving areas plagued by river erosion, lack of jobs, and natural disasters such as cyclones. As they become refugees in this mega-city, however, they still find it difficult to deal with these recent onsets of climate change; the effects upon as large of a city as Chittagong are alarming. Locals such as myself are growing increasingly concerned, as we all may have to shift from our original localities due to this excess of water. My ongoing project “Water World” seeks to bring these issues to light. The effects of climate change – rising sea levels and sea surface temperatures, resulting in greater instances of low pressure in the Bay of Bengal – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in coastal areas. Chittagong and Khulna, two major ports and business cities, are greatly threatened. The most heavily effected places are the old parts of Chittagong, like Chaktai, Khatunganj, Bakolia, and Agrabad. If things continue to worsen, the business hubs of Chaktai and Khatunganj could become completely submerged in the near future. The millions of people living in these areas have to battle tidal surge sometimes twice a day. Prior to this sudden regularity, the only tidal surge in remembered history occurred during 1991, when a hurricane hit the coastal area of Chittagong. The new, frequent tidal surges are even higher than that in 1991 and can remain for days on

Shahin (45) in front of their home which is more than sixty year old submerged by flood water at Chaktai, Chittagong. He is very concerned and unable to leave their home with his family.Regular tidal floods hits many places in Chittagong causing great damage to inhabitants. In the past few years, climate change has begun to take a major toll on my home city of Chittagong, Bangladesh. Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. Chittagong, the second-largest city in the country, is densely populated by people from all over Bangladesh who have come to the city to make a living, leaving areas plagued by river erosion, lack of jobs, and natural disasters such as cyclones. As they become refugees in this mega-city, however, they still find it difficult to deal with these recent onsets of climate change; the effects upon as large of a city as Chittagong are alarming. Locals such as myself are growing increasingly concerned, as we all may have to shift from our original localities due to this excess of water. My ongoing project “Water World” seeks to bring these issues to light. The effects of climate change – rising sea levels and sea surface temperatures, resulting in greater instances of low pressure in the Bay of Bengal – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in coastal areas. Chittagong and Khulna, two major ports and business cities, are greatly threatened. The most heavily effected places are the old parts of Chittagong, like Chaktai, Khatunganj, Bakolia, and Agrabad. If things continue to worsen, the business hubs of Chaktai and Khatunganj could become completely submerged in the near future. The millions of people living in these areas have to battle tidal surge sometimes twice a day. Prior to this sudden regularity, the

In the past few years, climate change has begun to take a major toll on my home city of Chittagong, Bangladesh. Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. Chittagong, the second-largest city in the country, is densely populated by people from all over Bangladesh who have come to the city to make a living, leaving areas plagued by river erosion, lack of jobs, and natural disasters such as cyclones. As they become refugees in this mega-city, however, they still find it difficult to deal with these recent onsets of climate change; the effects upon as large of a city as Chittagong are alarming. Locals such as myself are growing increasingly concerned, as we all may have to shift from our original localities due to this excess of water. My ongoing project “Water World” seeks to bring these issues to light. The effects of climate change – rising sea levels and sea surface temperatures, resulting in greater instances of low pressure in the Bay of Bengal – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in coastal areas. Chittagong and Khulna, two major ports and business cities, are greatly threatened. The most heavily effected places are the old parts of Chittagong, like Chaktai, Khatunganj, Bakolia, and Agrabad. If things continue to worsen, the business hubs of Chaktai and Khatunganj could become completely submerged in the near future. The millions of people living in these areas have to battle tidal surge sometimes twice a day. Prior to this sudden regularity, the only tidal surge in remembered history occurred during 1991, when a hurricane hit the coastal area of Chittagong. The new, frequent tidal surges are even higher than that in 1991 and can remain for days on end, causing great concern for the inhabitants. Scientists now predi

Samia (17) in front of their home after returns from college.she says it's been 5/6 years that tidal flood hits their place quite often.she never seen flood before that.If it continues we have to live our home which is more than sixty year old build by our gran parents. Regular Tidal flood ihits many places in Chittagong causing great damage to inhabitants. In the past few years, climate change has begun to take a major toll on my home city of Chittagong, Bangladesh. Tidal surge – water levels rising significantly above the tide levels that astronomy predicts - has begun to affect the city as much as twice a day, resulting in frequent flooding of residential and business areas. Chittagong, the second-largest city in the country, is densely populated by people from all over Bangladesh who have come to the city to make a living, leaving areas plagued by river erosion, lack of jobs, and natural disasters such as cyclones. As they become refugees in this mega-city, however, they still find it difficult to deal with these recent onsets of climate change; the effects upon as large of a city as Chittagong are alarming. Locals such as myself are growing increasingly concerned, as we all may have to shift from our original localities due to this excess of water. My ongoing project “Water World” seeks to bring these issues to light. The effects of climate change – rising sea levels and sea surface temperatures, resulting in greater instances of low pressure in the Bay of Bengal – have brought a sudden vulnerability to the lives and livelihoods of people living in coastal areas. Chittagong and Khulna, two major ports and business cities, are greatly threatened. The most heavily effected places are the old parts of Chittagong, like Chaktai, Khatunganj, Bakolia, and Agrabad. If things continue to worsen, the business hubs of Chaktai and Khatunganj could become completely submerged in the near future. The millions of people living in these areas have

When mom gives her princess a hair cut,and dad busy taking photographs

 

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hair cut day

19 August 2016

Monsoon is considered a beautiful season in Asia. It brings up romantic and nostalgic feelings in people inspiring them to create poetry, music, and cinemas. The sound of rain is a music to people’s ear.

However, every year Monsoon brings not only joy and happiness, it brings misery in many regions.

Excessive rains cause floods due to which people lose their homes, crops and become unable to live their regular lives.

 

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